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New Study: Children and Their Desire to Tan

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Sunshine vitamin and girl in the sun 500(3)

Children grow up ridiculously fast these days with and there are even some kids in elementary school that want to tan!

A new study from Pediatrics found the desire to tan grows stronger as children go from elementary school to junior high school. However, these kids also do not follow proper sunscreen habits.

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The survey also found that sunscreen use decreased by 50 percent, despite the fact that children spend more time outside tanning as they grow older.

As a wake-up call,the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery shared some startling facts with Momtrends about cancer and how to taking care of our kids' skin.

  • Melanoma is the most common skin cancer in children, followed by basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas,'? said Thomas Rohrer, M.D., Secretary of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery.
  • Only six severe sunburns in a lifetime increase risk of melanoma by 50 percent and one study estimated a 78% drop in skin cancer risk if parents protect their children from significant sun exposure in the first 18 years of life.
  • Parents, teachers and physicians should encourage sun avoidance and protection by monitoring their children'??s moles and freckles for the ABCDEs'??asymmetry, border irregularity, color variation, diameter, and evolving.
  • Encourage children to wear at least 30 SPF sunscreen and reapply it every two to three hours spent outdoors.
  • Avoid sun exposure during peak hours of intensity from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and wear sun protective clothing.

For more information, please visit: http://www.asds.net/

Momtrends was not paid for this post.

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