Beauty & Beyond: Fabulous Beauty Finds

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clarisonic

Back in the day, I used to just pump my cleanser on my hands, wash my face and rinse. Oh, silly uninformed lady. Using a cleansing brush actually makes the cleansing process more effective, removing more of the junk you don't want and leaving skin ready to better absorb the creams you do.

Enter Clarisonic. Created by the Sonicare toothbrush people, this is the queen of the facial cleansing treatments. Because the gentle brush oscillates at a sonic frequency of more than 300 movements per second it washes your faces six times better than with hands alone.

But they don't stop there. Not those innovative and crazy Clarisonic people. They take innovation beyond basic to new heights. First they had their original every-day everyone brush. Then a dual speed gray one. Then a just-for-the-guys brush. Now breaking through the boundaries even further (because...really...how many different kinds can you have), Clarisonic has come up with something for those prone to acne.

The Acne Clarifying collection is coming out this month and it includes everything you would need to clear your complex complexion. It contains the new Mia 2 with two speeds, the new acne cleansing brush head with velvet-like bristle tips for a gentle touch, and extra plush bristle graduation for pore flushing. It also comes with their new daily clarifying cleanser with 2% salicylic acid to gently dry blemishes and vitamins and bottanicals to soothe your troubled skin. The system also has a pulsing T-zone timer to ensure an even minute-long cleanse of the forehead, nose and chin.

A sidenote: Be sure to charge your Clarisonic device once every three months. I didn't and had to toss it because it lost its ability to charge.

Clarisonic is available at Sephora stores and clarisonic.com for $169.

not a gun

I just finished a piece for a lifestyle magazine about celeb fragrances. I sat captivated taking notes as a perfumer talked to me of notes (the other kind), accords, and gourmands. Then we went through and chatted (sometimes positively, sometimes not so much) about Madonna'??s new Truth or Dare (hated it), Katy Perry's Meow (sugary) and Rihanna's Rebelle (loved it).

This nose-who-knows went through every level of scent for me and really broke it all down. My question might not make sense but...why does a perfume need to smell differently after you put it on? Then smell differently after after after you put it on? That has always bothered me. What if I want to stick with the top notes? What if I'm sad when that smell goes on to the next one because I don't like that other one as much. *sigh*

There's a line of fragrances that addresses this issue with one of its new scents. It's Romano Ricci's Juliette Has a Gun parfums collection. Love the name, even though as a former Aerosmith follower I always end up singing Janie'??s Got a Gun. This is my problem. Not yours.

This six scent line is edgy and not traditional, giving sweet Juliette (the doomed Shakespearean lover) a modern weapon...seduction. One of its limited edition's scents is called Not a Perfume. Since a perfume is a composition of scents, this is literally not a perfume because it has only one note--Ambroxan, a synthetic fragrance to represent ambergris. It's fresh and stays true, so no jumping from scent to scent. This is the first fragrance on the market that doesn't bop all over the place with three notes or more. Ricci tells us that it'??s usually used in perfumery as a backnote, but because it'??s one of his favorites, he wanted it to play a leading role. The only role. Since it has such a unique composition, it'??s entirely allergen free.

And to add a little danger into the equation, they offer a purse bullet...this little silver bullet-shaped atomizer that you can fill with their scents.

Life is hard enough to keep track of without not knowing what you're going to smell like in an hour. Now you can shoot that problem right down, am I right?

Juliette Has a Gun Parfums are available at Henri Bendel and juliettehasagun.com for between $75-$135.

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Cheryl Fenton is a Boston-based freelance writer, who writes beauty, fashion and fitness for Boston Common, Stuff and Glamour magazines, as well as her own EasyPeasyBlog.com.

Momtrends was not paid for this post. We did receive samples for review purposes.

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