It's dangerously cold out there. The upcoming and impending Polar Vortex threatens to expose us to dangerously frigid conditions. With much of the country preparing for or dealing with this potential emergency, Save the Children has shared expert tips to ensure that kids stay safe and warm.

10 Tips to Protect Children in Cold Weather:

Untitled design (40)
  • Layer up! Bitter cold and snow can cause frostbite. Dress your child in several layers, and make sure their head, neck and hands are covered. Dress babies and young children in one more layer than an adult would wear.
  • Play it safe. Even when roads are closed to traffic, it’s not safe to play or sled in the street. Visibility may be limited due to snow banks and ice on the roads makes braking difficult.
  • Beware of clothing hazards. Scarves and hood strings can strangle smaller children so use other clothing to keep them warm.
  • Check in on warmth. Before kids head outside, tell them to come inside if they get wet or if they’re cold. Then keep watching them and checking in. They may want to continue playing outside even if they are wet or cold.
  • Use sunscreen. Children and adults can still get sunburned in the winter. Sun can reflect off the snow, so apply sunscreen to exposed areas.
  • Use caution around fires. Wood-burning stoves, fireplaces and outdoor fire-pits are cozy but can present danger – especially to small children. Use caution and put up protective gates when possible. If you’ve lost power or heat and are alternative heating methods like kerosene or electric heaters, be sure smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors are working.
  • Get trained and equipped. Children should wear helmets when snowboarding, skiing, sledding or playing ice hockey. And to avoid injuries, teach children how to do the activity safely.
  • Prevent nosebleeds. If your child suffers from minor winter nosebleeds, use a cold-air humidifier in their room. Saline nose drops can help keep their nose moist.
  • Keep them hydrated. In drier winter air kids lose more water through their breath. Offer plenty of water, and try giving them warm drinks and soup for extra appeal.
  • Watch for danger signs. Signs of frostbite are pale, grey or blistered skin on the fingers, ears, nose, and toes. If you think your child has frostbite bring the child indoors and put the affected area in warm (not hot) water. Signs of hypothermia are shivering, slurred speech, and unusual clumsiness. If you think your child has hypothermia call 9-1-1 immediately.

Recommended Articles

Five Tips for the Perfect Pumpkin Patch Visit 1

Five Tips for the Perfect Pumpkin Patch Visit

It's that time of the year again...pumpkin patch time! While I love a nice Pumpkin Spice Latte as much as the next fall lovin' girl...for me, the season is all about spending time with my family...and hopefully that time is spent outside as much as possible. If you're headed out ...read more

Pumpkin Spice Dirt Bomb Recipe

Perfect for Fall Pumpkin Spice Dirt Bomb Recipe

Get your pumpkin spice fix with this tasty dirt bomb recipe. Unlike fried donuts, this recipe is a little lighter and, since no hot oil is involved, a lot less messy. These dirt bombs, or baked donuts, are irresistible cakey muffins that are spiked with nutmeg and ginger, and ...read more

Ski Swaps

Save Money at a Ski Swap

Are the slopes in your future? If you want to save money on ski gear, consider a ski swap. A swap is a great way to buy and sell used equipment. Most swaps consist of a variety of gear, from brand new to used skis and snowboards to skis; from poles to boots to bindings and ...read more

The record cold temps can make your energy bills soar. Here's how you can stay warm and save energy.

Sources: Save the Children, American Academy of Pediatrics, University of Michigan Health System

This is not a sponsored post.

Related Articles