Road Testing the Bosch eBike

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bosch ebike

Getting a turbo-boost when out cycling--that's pretty cool. This month I got to test out the Bosch eBike components on a test ride in Brooklyn Bridge Park.

Sometimes you don't want a workout on your bike, you simply want to use it to get from point A to point B. That's where motor-assisted technology comes in. Assist systems used to be heavy, noisy and cumbersome. Most NYers (except for delivery folks) ignored them opting to just walk and be late or take a taxi.

But things have changed and the technology is vastly improved. Bosch has been building a huge following in Europe--where bike commuting is much more common--now they are ready to take on the US market.

I loved my ride. It was smooth, easy to figure out and a heck of a lot of fun. After my test drive (er, test cycle?), I can picture myself tooling to all my meetings on a commuter bike--when I face a steep uphill or want to get somewhere in a hurry, I can tap the computer, get an assist, and GO. The system consists of three parts (see below) that are installed on a bicycle. The key components of the system are the Drive Unit, PowerPack, and Intuvia on-board computer.

components

Once installed the system boosts a cyclist’s human power with electric power at speeds up to 32 kmh (20 mph). The system is VERY easy to use. Simply push a button to switch between 5 riding modes. For the best "mileage" off your charge, keep in in eco. I would say the "eco" setting is like have a tailwind all the time, For bad-boy hills, hit the turbo and whooosh! up you go. The computer will also let you check speed, distance and battery power.

ebike computer
bosch ebike picture

Bosch (they are best known in the automotive industry) is responsible for the upgrade in the world of electric bicycle drive systems and they want to get us out of our cars and on the bike paths. Right now there are six North American brands outfitted with Bosch assist: Cube, EasyMotion, Felt, Haibike, Lapierre, and Xtracycle (more coming in 2016 including Cannondale). You've got to buy a special make and model bike to work with Bosch--it's not made to slap on to any old bike.

For my test spin, I rode a Felt mountain bike--it's s good city commuter bike. The bike was light enough for me to lift--even with the 3-part system mounted on the bike. When you wear the battery down (this depends on how much assist you use and how far you go--the turbo setting gives you 20-something miles and eco will get you about 70 miles before having to recharge) you simply unlock the battery from the frame and take it in to charge. Easy peasy.

Get more details on where to find them www.bosch-ebike.com I highly recommend giving this system a spin. It's a trend worth trying.

This is not a sponsored post.

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